(Source: monkeearmada, via opalinebaby)

10 Animals You Probably Didn’t Know Existed

aquihayunflan:

We’ve all heard about the flying squirrel, vampire bats, and naked mole rat, but I bet you haven’t heard of Markhor, Lamprey, and Gerenuk!

Here are ten animals that you probably haven’t heard of!

(Too lazy to write a good introduction!)

Related:

 1. Tufted Deer

Tufted deers are a small species of deer that are found in China. They are mainly solitary creatures, sometimes found in pairs, and they are very shy. Also, majestic fangs.

tufted deer

2. Star-nosed Mole

Star-nosed moles are small moles found in eastern Canada and United States along wet and low areas.

starnosed mole

3. Southern Right Whale Dolphin

Southern right whale dolphins are small species found in cool waters far south. They have no visible teeth or dorsal fin but they still leap out of the water gorgeously.

Southern right whale dolphin

4. Raccoon Dog

Raccoon Dogs, or Tanuki, are found in East Asia. They are not actually a type of raccoons, but they climb trees regularly.

raccoon dog

5. Patagonian Mara

Patagonian Maras are large rodents found in parts of Argentina. They are herbivorous and cute.

patagonian mara

Relevant: 5 Members Of The Animal Kingdom That Will Blow Your Mind

6. Markhor

Markhors are large species of wild goats that are found in Afghanistan and Pakistan. They are classified as endagered species by the IUCN since there are only 2,500 mature markhors in existence.

markhor

7. Maned Wolf

Maned Wolves are found in South America. They live mostly in grasslands.

maned wolf

8. Lamprey

Lampreys are the spawn of hell. Kidding. They are jawless fish that suck the blood of fish, or humans, and their body hasn’t changed since 300 milion years ago.

lamprey

9. Gerenuk

Gerenuks are long-necked species of antelopes found in Eastern Africa. They stand up to graze for food. Very picky eaters!

gerenuk

10. Amazonian Royal Flycatcher

Amazonian Royal Flycatchers are found in the Amazon. They are about 6 inches and they mostly eat insects.

amazonian royal flycatcher

smithsonianmag:

How the Star-Nosed Mole ‘Sees’ With Its Ultra-Sensitive Snout
That’s an actual, earthly animal you’re looking at in the photo above—not, as you might have assumed, a creature out of Star Wars. The star-nosed mole, which resides in the bogs and wetlands of the eastern U.S. and Canada, is roughly the size of a rat when fully-grown. It’s functionally blind and eats insects, worms and small fish.
But the most noticeable aspect of the animal is its utterly strange appearance, dominated by its 22-tentacled ultra-sensitive snout, called a star (those aren’t its eyes and face at the center of the pink fleshy area, but rather its nostrils). This snout, used to hunt and grab prey, features more than 100,000 nerve endings packed into an area barely more than 1 cm in diameter, making it one of the most sensitive touch organs in the whole animal kingdom. - Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.
Photo by: Kenneth Catania

smithsonianmag:

How the Star-Nosed Mole ‘Sees’ With Its Ultra-Sensitive Snout

That’s an actual, earthly animal you’re looking at in the photo above—not, as you might have assumed, a creature out of Star Wars. The star-nosed mole, which resides in the bogs and wetlands of the eastern U.S. and Canada, is roughly the size of a rat when fully-grown. It’s functionally blind and eats insects, worms and small fish.

But the most noticeable aspect of the animal is its utterly strange appearance, dominated by its 22-tentacled ultra-sensitive snout, called a star (those aren’t its eyes and face at the center of the pink fleshy area, but rather its nostrils). This snout, used to hunt and grab prey, features more than 100,000 nerve endings packed into an area barely more than 1 cm in diameter, making it one of the most sensitive touch organs in the whole animal kingdom. - Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.

Photo by: Kenneth Catania

A word about bronies.

theswedishelf:

saintcheshire:

So I just got back last night from a brony convention in San Francisco. I was working a booth for a vendor friend, and let me tell you what happened:

We met a little girl who was there with her family. She got a button drawn at our booth, told us all about her favorite…

First off, story’s fake. Second, brony cons =/= children’s toy expos, but even still, children are always treated well at them.

I’m glad the story is fake, but incidents like this are very possible -  I’ve personally met bronies so creeptastic they spooked me, and I’m a freaking adult. Like, I’m super glad the story is fake and I appreciate being made aware of that, but it kind of says a lot about the condition of the fandom that something like that is believable.

(Source: princess-nietzsche)

A word about bronies.

saintcheshire:

So I just got back last night from a brony convention in San Francisco. I was working a booth for a vendor friend, and let me tell you what happened:

We met a little girl who was there with her family. She got a button drawn at our booth, told us all about her favorite ponies, and was overall just too damn cute. She had an MLP lanyard filled with pins she’d gotten in the vendor’s room, and gave me a Fluttershy pin because she liked my cosplay. She ended up just hanging out with us for a while and bein’ super cute. We call her Babby because she’s 11 and precious.

The next day, she runs up to the booth, terrified, and asks if she can please hide under our table for a few minutes. Turns out a dude had been following her around the con all day, and tried to get her to come up to his hotel room. Alone. She tells us she thought he was okay at first because he was wearing an MLP shirt, but she didn’t want to go anywhere with him, and he made her uneasy. At one point, after she’d refused, he grabbed her arm in the elevators and tried to get her to follow him. She ran, and now she wants somewhere to hide.

We tell her of course, hurry her behind our booth and fucking station ourselves around her because she’s eleven years old and all of us are prepared to physically attack the human trashheap who tries to fuck with her. We’re all dressed up in wings and ears and we’re 100000% prepared to rip them off and launch across that table to defend this kid. Eventually this very large dude strolls by, very obviously looking around, and she quietly points him out to us. At this point I’m ready to set him on fire, but when I ask if she needs me to go report him, she shakes her head. She doesn’t want to get in trouble, or make anyone mad.

We see him a few more times over the course of the day, because he keeps meandering over to our booth and just casually looking around. Eventually he actually stops to take a flier from our table and asks us a question, and we coldly send him on his way. We start sending a coworker with Babby whenever her parents aren’t around and she wants to go check out artist’s alley or the vendor’s hall. Because otherwise she’s not safe. She can’t run around and freely enjoy a convention about a show aimed at her, because instead of being surrounded by peers she’s somehow surrounded by men who pose a threat to her.

My point here: this is why I fucking hate “bronies.” Because grown-ass men are flooding into a space carved out for children—often little girls—and are making it unsafe for them.

I met a lot of non-awful people there, of course. I met a lot of parents and older siblings. A lot of adorable little boys who were happy to empathize with female characters, and a lot of little kids who wanted a picture with cosplays of their favorite pony. I met a lot of people who were cool and nice and just liked cartoons. I met a male Pinkie Pie cosplayer with a Fluttershy lady-friend who juggled and spun plates and was happy to entertain kids, and were generally just really cool people.

But I also met a lot of skeevy dudebros. A lot of guys in fedoras loudly discussing sexual shit in a room with children. Guys who drew/sold/displayed really fucking inappropriate “fanart,” including gross bodypillows that had no purpose in a little kids’ toy convention. I met a guy who gushed with absolute glee about the pleasure he derives from “corrupting innocence.” I met a lot of people who wanted to take something sweet and nice for children and make it about THEM. A lot of guys who wanted to make it about their dicks. People who made it UNSAFE for the intended audience to even be in attendance.

So yeah. If you call yourself a brony, I’m prolly not gonna trust you. Because I’ve seen y’all in action, and I am not impressed. Frankly I’m infuriated. This is like a bunch of gross neckbeards swarming Disneyland and shoving kids out of the way so they can grope Cinderella, and finding nothing wrong with it because they think they’re entitled to it.

My Little Pony is a really cute show with a lot of nice messages for kids, and gross brony shitweasels are trying to fucking take it from them by force. And I will fight them.

My little pony is for children. It’s okay to like it, but if you invade their space and make them feel unsafe then you are the worst kind of trash. It is our duty as adult fans to make sure spaces like that stay safe for children. I fucking hate what the brony fandom has become. 

(Source: princess-nietzsche, via queerghost)

zooborns:

Meet the 3-Day-Old Sloth at Ellen Trout Zoo

Only three days old, this male Linne’s Two-toed Sloth born at Texas’s Ellen Trout Zoo is already strong enough to hang onto mom’s fur as she climbs about.

Read about this birth at Zooborns.

zooborns:

Echidna Puggle Gets a Helping Hand

A team of veterinary nurses at the wildlife hospital of Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Australia has been hand-raising and caring for an orphaned Echidna puggle since it was found on a road in November.

Learn more about this monotreme at Zooborns.

zooborns:

Echidna Puggle Gets a Helping Hand

A team of veterinary nurses at the wildlife hospital of Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Australia has been hand-raising and caring for an orphaned Echidna puggle since it was found on a road in November.

Learn more about this monotreme at Zooborns.

sinniferificus:

untexting:

we all have that one follower who we want to be sexually successful with

"sexually successful" what a magnificent phrase 

Only one?

oh man my outfit is on point today and it is making me so happy

pink broomstick skirt, purple tank, green floral vest with studs and my “manic pixie death goddess” bracelet next to a bracelet of rainbow skulls

i’m glittery and pastel and i blew bubbles today in the sunshine while my sailor moon wand was drying (stage one is complete - next i bulk it up and add details with air dry clay)

i slept in and watched Archer for over an hour and i smell like strawberries

the visit with my folks went really well yesterday and my ex-husband (who i moved here to get away from, remember) is behaving so erratically and flamboyantly strangely in our hometown that my family no longer regrets  my decision to move two hours away

AND my mom is recovering from her illness really well, and she and my sister are both reducing their medications successfully

and basically while life in general can be super stressful, TODAY is a good day and I’m holding on to that

So this just happened.

modmad:

modmad:

image

image

image

image

image

My sincerest apologies to the random dude that I just French dipped in public and then proceeded to make a comic about.

holy crap this made its way back onto my dash why are there that many notes there should not be that many

(via adashinobeniox)

jadelyn:

knitmeapony:

rashkah:

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

nineprotons

OH god I need half of these.

THE DNA TREE OF LIFE ONE….

Picard: Use your words
Janeway: Use your head
Kirk: Use your heart
Sisko: USE THE SUBTLE SMOULDER OF A PANTHER STALKING ITS PREY AND THEN YELL PASSIONATELY ABOUT EVERYTHING
autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

(via tacticalnymphomania)

saydolly:

Aziz Ansari is like the king of callouts.

(Source: renloras, via jump-in-the-pudding)